Workshops

WORKSHOP I – WILDLIFE ACOUSTICS MONITORING

  • Date: Friday, June 5th
  • Time: 1:00 – 5:00 pm
  • Location: UMC 247
  • Instructor: Ali Donargo
  • Cost per person: FREE (registration still required)
  • Minimum Attendance: TBD
  • Maximum Attendance: 40

Please join Wildlife Acoustics for a hands-on training session in bat bioacoustics tools. This is a rare training opportunity for researchers just starting or already involved in using acoustics to monitor bats.  During this comprehensive session, Wildlife Acoustics’ staff will host a hands-on workshop to teach participants the features and set up of the Song Meter SM4BAT and the Song Meter Mini Bat.  In the Kaleidoscope Pro software analysis section participants will learn how to use Wildlife Acoustics classifiers.  The focus will be on using Kaleidoscope Pro to produce quantifiable outputs from both large and small data sets. An email with instructions for installing a demo license of Kaleidoscope Pro Analysis Software along with sample recordings for hands-on practice will be provided. Please note that the workshop will cover the properties of sound and Wildlife Acoustics equipment only. Limited space available. Organizers: Wildlife Acoustics, Inc.


WORKSHOP II – COURSE-BASED UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH EXPERIENCES (CUREs): EDUCATIONAL WORKSHOP FOR IMPLEMENTING MAMMALOGY CUREs INTO THE UNDERGRADUATE CURRICULUM

  • Date: Friday, June 5th
  • Time: 3:00 – 5:00 pm
  • Location: UMC 415
  • Instructors: Patrice Connors, Laura Disney, Jennifer Duggan, Liesl Erb, Liz Flaherty, John Hanson, Hayley Lanier, Johanna Varner, and Christopher Yahnke
  • Cost per person (includes refreshments): $10 Students, $15 Non-Students
  • Minimum Attendance: TBD
  • Maximum Attendance: 30

Research opportunities are critical occasions for undergraduate students to experience the scientific process, develop technical skills and workforce readiness, and evaluate career decisions. However, extracurricular opportunities to work in a lab typically benefit select, well-prepared students and often reinforce structural inequalities that discourage students from underrepresented minorities. In contrast, course-based undergraduate research experiences (CUREs) are becoming a common way to introduce more students to research because they engage all students enrolled in a course in an authentic experience. Despite growing recognition of the importance of providing such opportunities, many instructors may find developing and implementing CUREs in their own classes to be challenging due to lack of institutional support, class size limitations, or the need to balance other teaching and research obligations.To address these challenges, we have developed a series of four CURE modules to investigate different aspects of the behavioral ecology of sciurid rodents and successfully implemented these CUREs in our own courses. Organizers: Hayley Lanier and Johanna Varner.


WORKSHOP III – WILDLIFE INSIGHTS: A NEW PLATFORM TO AUTOMATE AND ANALYZE CAMERA TRAP BIG DATA FOR CONSERVATION

  • Date: Friday, June 5th
  • Time: 3:00 – 5:00 pm
  • Location: UMC 417
  • Instructors: Roland Kays, William McShea, and Stephanie Schuttler
  • Cost per person (includes refreshments): $10 Students, $15 Non-Students
  • Minimum Attendance: TBD
  • Maximum Attendance: 30

Wildlife Insights aims to be the most comprehensive wildlife monitoring platform, providing the world’s largest open camera trap database and access to the latest tools in conservation technology. Most researchers using camera traps are currently overwhelmed and burdened by the task of managing large volumes of camera trap data. Digital camera traps provide a wealth of information with as many as thousands of wildlife detections from a single deployment. Wildlife Insights makes uploading and managing camera traps images easy for researchers to use and the results accessible for the public to understand. Camera trap scientists upload photos to a central repository and cutting-edge artificial intelligence technology sorts through photos helping researchers automatically identify species and separate blank photos from wildlife detections. With more people contributing to the Wildlife Insights platform, more data are shared, providing more power to scientists, local communities, governments, and stakeholders to work together in monitoring wildlife populations, detecting declines, and understanding species ranges. In this workshop, we will demonstrate how anyone can utilize Wildlife Insights to improve camera trap data management, wildlife research and wildlife monitoring efforts. Organizer: William McShea.